America's longest living man with type 1 diabetes turns 90

Despite the advances in diabetes medications, individuals who have type 1 diabetes have a lower life expectancy than the average person because even with proper diabetes management, they have a higher risk of experiencing life-threatening health complications, such as heart disease and stroke.

However, one San Diego man has defied these odds. Bob Krause, who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 5, recently turned 90 years old, making him the longest living man with the disease in the U.S., according to an article published by Fox News.

Krause told the news provider that his brother died from type 1 diabetes only a year after being told he had the disease, since insulin injections had not been invented at that time.



This made Krause feel lucky that he had access to diabetes treatments that his sibling did not, and encouraged him to be meticulous with his diabetes management.

He said that he has lived this long by treating his body like a car and only consuming enough food to gain the energy he needs to perform daily tasks.

"To keep your diabetes under control you only eat the food you need to before you have activities to perform. I eat to keep me alive instead of eating all the time, or for pleasure," Krause said, quoted by the news source.

His family and healthcare providers also vouched for Krause's diligent diabetes management. One endocrinologist, Patricia Wu, MD, told the news organization that he always comes to their appointments carrying a briefcase full of detailed graphs that depict his blood sugar levels, caloric intake and insulin doses over the previous months.

Krause's son, who also has type 1 diabetes, said that his father keeps a box of sugar cubes next to his bed in case he experiences nocturnal hyperglycemia - low blood sugar levels during the night.

According to the American Diabetes Association, about 3 million individuals have type 1 diabetes in the U.S. The organization states that one in every 400 children and adolescents has the chronic condition.
First published on: June 10, 2011